Foot Plating System

2021-08-19T20:24:23+00:00

BioPro® Foot Plating System

A comprehensive plating solution for the forefoot, midfoot, and hindfoot.

System Overview

A comprehensive plating system merges modern technology with plating basics. The system includes 45 universal plates as well as indication-specific plating families. The plates feature MVA (multiple variable angle) locking technology that allows screws to lock into the plate up to 25 degrees.

The intuitive, modular tray design and color-coded instrumentation allows surgeons to use one tray to implant any plate in the system.

Clinical Benefits

Ready to schedule a surgery?

Complete the form or contact us at

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Offering

2.0mm Universal Plates

2.8mm Universal Plates

3.0-3.5mm Universal Plates

MTP Fusion

Pre-contoured, low profile plates for the fusion of the first MTP joint. The plates feature 10° of dorsiflexion and a contoured distal spoon for convergent screw placement into the phalanx. The distal spoon accepts 2.8mm screws while the proximal shaft accepts 3.0 or 3.5mm screws.


Lapidus Plates

Medial and dorsal plates are available for the fusion of the first TMT joint. The medial plate features a contour for a low profile fit on the medial wall of the first metatarsal and medial cuneiform. The contour also allows for convergent screw placement into the cuneiform. Dorsal plates are available in 0 - 4mm steps in both left and right orientation.

Basal Wedge

Opening wedge plates are available in 0, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6mm wedges.

Evans Osteotomy

Uniquely shaped Evans Wedge plates are designed to sit directly below Gissane's angle on hard cortical bone. This prevents wedge subsidence and minimizes plate contact with the perineal tendons.

Dwyer Osteotomy

Dwyer plates are available in 4, 6, 8, and 10mm steps. The plates feature an oval screw slot to deliver optimal compression.

ORIF Calcaneus Fracture

ORIF Calcaneus Plates are available for fractures of the calcaneus. The plates are available in short, medium, and long and offer a minimally invasive sinus tarsi approach.

Resources

TitleDocument Link
Foot Plating System Tray Layout Guide

View PDF

Foot Plating System IFU (English)

View PDF

Foot Plating System 510k

View PDF

Foot Plating System Brochure

View PDF

Foot Plating System Surgical Technique

View PDF

NEUROLAC®

2021-08-06T13:52:30+00:00

NEUROLAC®

NEUROLAC® nerve guides are indicated for reconstruction of a peripheral nerve discontinuity up to 20 mm in patients with a complete division of a peripheral nerve. NEUROLAC® nerve guides provide guidance and protection to regenerated axons and prevent ingrowth of fibrous tissue into the nerve gap during nerve regeneration from the proximal to the distal nerve stump of the transected nerve. Tension-less nerve repair offers optimal nerve healing. There is no need for autologous transplants which eliminates donor site morbidity. NEUROLAC® nerve guides are designed to prevent kinking and collapse and early flexion of joints is feasible.

Clinical Benefits

  • Fully synthetic, biologically inert and clinically proven to be safe.
  • High transparency enables optimal positioning of nerve ends and detection of blood clots.
  • Mechanical properties retained for up to 10 weeks enabling optimal support and protection for the healing nerve.
  • Fully resorbs within 16 months, no removal needed.
  • Thin wall allows easy suturing of (even the smallest) nerve stumps.
  • Prevents ingrowth of fibrous tissue.
  • Ideal for tension-less nerve repair.
  • Retains its form to prevent kinking and collapse.

BioPro is an authorized distributor for Polygancis

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Resources

TitleTypeDocument Linkdoc_type_hfilter
NEUROLAC BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
NEUROLAC Clinical ApplicationSurgical Technique

View PDF

surgical-techniques

Cannulated Compression Screws

2021-08-06T13:48:28+00:00

Cannulated Compression Screw Systems 

System Overview

Go-EZ™ Headed Cannulated Compression Screws and HBS® Headless Cannulated Compression Screws are manufactured from implant-grade Titanium and available in multiple diameters and lengths.

Clinical Benefits

Sterile Packaged

Each screw is individually sterile packed and housed in a protective blister to protect screw threads. This ensures sharp-cutting teeth and improves traceability for hospital and patient records.

Unique Cutting Tips

Self-drilling + self-tapping cutting tips for effortless screw advancement.

Various Styles and Sizes

Go-EZ Headed Cannulated Screw System is available in 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 6.5mm diameters. HBS Headless Cannulated Screw System is available in 2.5 and 3.0mm diameters with a new 3.0mm fully threaded version.

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Implant Options

Go-EZ Headed Cannulated Screws

Diameter Lengths Feature
2.0mm 6-50mm (2mm Increments) Self-Drilling + Self-Tapping
2.5mm 6-50mm (2mm Increments) Self-Drilling + Self-Tapping
3.0mm 6-40mm (2mm Increments) Self-Drilling + Self-Tapping
3.5mm 6-50mm (2mm Increments) Self-Drilling + Self-Tapping
4.0mm 6-50mm (2mm Increments) Self-Drilling + Self-Tapping
4.5mm 6-50mm (2mm Increments) Self-Drilling + Self-Tapping
6.5mm 30-40mm (2mm Increments)

45-120 (5mm Increments)

Self-Drilling + Self-Tapping

HBS Headless Cannulated Screws

Diameter Lengths Feature
2.5mm 10-40mm (2mm Increments) Self-Drilling + Self-Tapping
3.0mm 10-40mm (2mm Increments) Self-Drilling + Self-Tapping
2.5mm 10-30mm (1mm Increments) Self-Tapping
3.0mm 10-30mm (1mm Increments) Self-Tapping
3.0mm 10-30mm (2mm Increments) Fully Threaded Self-Drilling + Self-Tapping

Resources

TitleTypeDocument Linkdoc_type_hfilter
Go-EZ Cannulated Screw IFU (English)IFU

View PDF

ifu
HBS Cannulated Screw IFU (English)IFU

View PDF

ifu
Cannulated Compression Screw BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
Cannulated Compression Screw Surgical TechniqueSurgical Technique

View PDF

surgical-techniques
Metacarpal Fracture Intramedullary Fixation with BioPro HBS Headless Cannulated ScrewsCase Study

View PDF

case-study
HBS Cannulated Screw 510k510k

View PDF

510k
Go-EZ Cannulated Screw 510k510k

View PDF

510k
HBS Cannulated Screw IFU (Canadian French)IFU

View PDF

ifu
Go-EZ Cannulated Screw IFU (Canadian French)IFU

View PDF

ifu

Osteotec® Silicone Finger Implant

2021-08-06T13:51:01+00:00

Osteotec® Silicone Finger

System Overview

The Osteotec Silicone Finger Implant is a single-piece flexible joint replacement implant for the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints in the hand; commonly due to rheumatoid or osteoarthritis.

Clinical Benefits

MCP or PIP

Simple instrumentation and implant designed to replace either joint.

Durable Design

Manufactured from high tear-resistant implant grade silicone with a proven dorsal load transferring hinge.

Anatomical Fit

Eleven, evenly scaled sizes for a comprehensive anatomical fit.

BioPro is an authorized distributor for: Osteotec

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Resources

TitleTypeDocument Linkdoc_type_hfilter
Silicone Finger BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
Silicone Finger Surgical TechniqueSurgical Technique

View PDF

surgical-techniques
Silicone Finger IFU (Multi Language)IFU

View PDF

ifu
Silicone Finger 510k510k

View PDF

510k
Proximal interphalangeal joint silicone arthroplasty–comparison of Swanson and NeuFlex implants using a new evaluation scorePublication

View Abstract

publication
NeuFlex and Swanson metacarpophalangeal implants for rheumatoid arthritis: prospective randomized, controlled clinical trialPublication

View Abstract

publication
Results of silastic arthroplasty for proximal interphalangeal joint degenerative disease in the handWhite Paper

View PDF

white-paper

MPJ Hemi Implants

2021-09-16T13:34:53+00:00

BioPro® MPJ Hemi Implants

Successfully treating Hallux Rigidus since 1952.1

System Overview

The most comprehensive phalangeal based Hemi implant system available on the market today. BioPro Hemi Implants are simple to implant, remove the minimum amount of bone possible, and preserve the anatomy of the toe. The implants are an excellent alternative to arthrodesis, offering patients pain relief and motion.2

View Hemi Publications

Clinical Benefits

Reproducible Results

The BioPro First MPJ Hemi Implant has over 65 years of clinical use with studies on average, reporting 95%+ implant survivorship.1-12 Simple instrumentation helps ensure consistent, reproducible results.

Satisfied Patients

Recent studies report 97% satisfaction at 8.3 years. In addition to maintaining motion, the implant allows for immediate weight bearing at the discretion of the surgeon allowing the patient to return to activity on average 5 weeks faster than fusion patients. 2

Revision Options

In the right patient, our implants have been proven to last 20+ years.3 If complications do arise, studies show conversion from a failed hallux phalangeal hemiarthroplasty to arthrodesis have similar success rates to primary arthrodesis.4

Choose Your Implant

STANDARD (NPC)

OVERVIEW
Ideal for good quality bone
PROFILE
2.5mm
MATERIAL
Cobalt Chrome or Titanium
SIZES
5

POROUS COATED (PC)

OVERVIEW
Improved biological fixation
PROFILE
2.5mm + 1mm coating
MATERIAL
Cobalt Chrome or Titanium
SIZES
5

HEMIEDGE™

OVERVIEW
Reduced chance of overgrowth, migration, or implant subsidence
PROFILE
2.5mm + 1mm edge
MATERIAL
Cobalt Chrome
SIZES
5

LESSER

OVERVIEW
Designed for digits 2-5
PROFILE
2.0mm
MATERIAL
Cobalt Chrome
SIZES
9

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Resources

TitleTypeDocument Linkdoc_type_hfilter
First MPJ Hemi Surgical TechniqueSurgical Technique

View PDF

surgical-techniques
First MPJ Hemi BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
Perspective on MPJ implant arthroplastyBrochure

View PDF

brochure
Cartiva RevisionCase Study

View PDF

case-study
A metallic hemiarthroplasty resurfacing prosthesis for the hallux metatarsophalangeal jointPublication

View PDF

publication
Long-Term Results of Hemiarthroplasty Compared With Arthrodesis for Osteoarthritis of the First Metatarsophalangeal JointPublication

View Abstract

publication
HemiEDGE BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
HemiEDGE Surgical TechniqueSurgical Technique

View PDF

surgical-techniques
MPJ Hemi 510k510k

View PDF

510k
MPJ Hemi IFU (Multi Language)IFU

View PDF

ifu
HemiEDGE 510k510k

View PDF

510k
HemiEDGE Case StudyCase Study

View PDF

case-study
Lesser MPJ Hemi BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
Lesser MPJ Hemi Surgical TechniqueSurgical Technique

View PDF

surgical-techniques
Treatment of Freiberg’s Infraction with the Titanium Hemi-implantPublication

View Abstract

publication
Metallic hemiarthroplasty for the treatment of end-stage hallux rigidus: mid-term implant survival, functional outcome and cost analysisPublication

View Abstract

publication
Operative Treatment for Osteoarthritis of the First Metatarsophalangeal Joint: Arthrodesis Versus HemiarthroplastyPublication

View Abstract

publication
Short-Term Clinical Outcome of Hemiarthroplasty Versus Arthrodesis for End-Stage Hallux RigidusPublication

View Abstract

publication
A retrospective cohort study of the BioPro hemiarthroplasty prosthesisPublication

View Abstract

publication
First metatarsophalangeal hemiarthroplasty for hallux rigidusPublication

View Study

publication
A prospective investigation of the BioPro hemi-arthroplasty for the first metatarsophalangeal jointPublication

View Abstract

publication
First Metatarsophalangeal Hemiarthroplasty for Grade III and IV Hallux RigidusPublication

View Abstract

publication
Contemporary Approaches to Stage II and III Hallux Rigidus: The Role of Metallic Hemiarthroplasty of the Proximal PhalanxPublication

View Abstract

publication
BioPro resurfacing endoprosthesis versus periarticular osteotomy for hallux rigidus: short-term follow-up and analysisPublication

View Abstract

publication
Metallic proximal phalangeal hemiarthroplasty for hallux rigidusPublication

View Abstract

publication
First MPJ Hemi IFU (Canadian French)IFU

View PDF

ifu
Hemi Implant Sales SheetBrochure

View PDF

brochure
MPJ Hemi Value Analysis GuideValue Analysis Guide

View PDF

value-analysis-guide
  1. Timothy Voskuijl, MD, Ron Onstenk, MD. Operative Treatment for Osteoarthritis of the First Metatarsophalangeal Joint: Arthrodesis Versus Hemiarthroplasty. The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery xxx (2015) 1–4
  2. Karin H. Simons, MD, Pieter van der Woude, MD, Frank W.M. Faber, MD, PhD , Paulien M. van Kampen, PhD , Bregje J.W. Thomassen, PhD. Short-Term Clinical Outcome of Hemiarthroplasty Versus Arthrodesis for End-Stage Hallux Rigidus. The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery xxx (2015) 1–4
  3. Giza E, Sullivan MR. First Metatarsophalangeal Hemiarthroplasty for Grade III and IV Hallux Rigidus Techniques in Foot and Ankle Surgery 4(1):10-17,2005
  4.  Clement, N. D., MacDonald, D., Dall, G. F., Ahmed, I., Duckworth, A. D., Shalaby, H. S., & McKinley, J. (2016). Metallic hemiarthroplasty for the treatment of end-stage hallux rigidus. Bone Joint J, 98-B(7), 945-951.
  5. Taranow, DO. et al. Contemporary Approaches to Stage II and III Hallux Rigidus: The Role of Metallic Hemiarthroplasty of the Proximal Phalanx. Foot and Ankle Clinics , Volume 10 , Issue 4 , 713 - 728
  6. Roukis TS, Townley, MD. BIOPRO resurfacing endoprosthesis versus periarticular osteotomy for hallux rigidus: short-term follow-up and analysis. Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery 2003;42(6):350-8
  7. Juan C. Goez, DPM, Charles O. Townley MD, Warren Taranow, DO. An Update on the Metallic Hemiarthroplasty Resurfacing Prosthesis for the Hallux. Presented at the 56th Annual Meeting and Scientific Seminar of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Orlando FL February 1998
  8. Charles G. Kissel, DPM, FACFAS, Zeeshan S. Husain, DPM AACFAS, Paul H. Wooley, PhD, Michael Kruger, MS, Mark A. Schumaker, DPM, Michael Sullivan, DPM, and Todd Snoeyink, DPM. A Prospective Investigation of the Biopro® Hemi-Arthroplasty for the First Metatarsophalangeal Joint. The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery 47(6):505–509, 2008
  9. Taranow, DO , Townley, MD. Metallic proximal phalangeal hemiarthroplasty for hallux rigidus. Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics 1999;9(1):33
  10. Townley, MD, Taranow, DO. A metallic hemiarthroplasty resurfacing prosthesis for the hallux metatarsophalangeal joint. Foot & Ankle International 1994;15(11):575-80
  11. Christine C. Salonga, DPM, David C. Novicki, DPM, FACFAS , Martin M. Pressman, DPM, FACFAS , D. Scot Malay, DPM, MSCE, FACFAS. A Retrospective Cohort Study of the BioPro Hemiarthroplasty Prosthesis. The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery 49 (2010) 331–339
  12.  Giza, E., Sullivan, M., Ocel, D., Lundeen, G., Mitchell, M., & Frizzell, L. (2010). First metatarsophalangeal hemiarthroplasty for hallux rigidus. International Orthopaedics, 34(8), 1193–1198. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00264-010-1012-x 13. Garras, D. N., Durinka, J. B., Bercik, M., Miller, A. G., & Raikin, S. M. (2013). Conversion Arthrodesis for Failed First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Hemiarthroplasty. Foot & Ankle International, 34(9), 1227–1232.

Tendon Anchor System

2021-08-06T13:46:53+00:00

Tendon Anchor System

Soft tissue attachment simplified.

System Overview

The BioPro Tendon Anchor System (T.A.S.) is a toothed, titanium anchor designed for soft tissue reattachment to bone. The sutureless design simplifies soft tissue reattachment and allows for increased pull-out strength.1

Clinical Benefits

No Suture Required

The screw + washer interface eliminates the most common mode of failure with traditional attachment methods; the tendon-suture interface.2 The self-drilling + self-tapping screw design allows for easy application, reducing overall procedure time.

Improved Pull-Out Strength

The anchors feature 2mm staggard teeth that engage multiple fiber bundles to provide ~3x pull-out strength of traditional suture anchors.1 The blunt teeth are designed not to penetrate bone, preventing tendon over compression.

Low Profile

The low profile design of the anchor features recessed screw holes, allowing the screw head to sit flush with the anchor, preventing implant prominence.

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Anchor Options

One-Hole Anchor
Dimensions
10mm x 9.5mm
Kit Contents
(1) anchor, (1) holder, (1) 3.0x15mm screw, (1) 3.0x20mm screw, (1) screwdriver
Two-Hole Anchor
Dimensions
26mm x 10mm
Kit Contents
(1) anchor, (1) Olive K-wire, (2) 3.0x15mm screw, (2) 3.0x20mm screw, (1) screwdriver

Resources

Kidner Procedure

Haglunds Procedure

TitleTypeDocument Linkdoc_type_hfilter
Tendon Anchor System BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
Tendon Anchor System Surgical TechniqueSurgical Technique

View PDF

surgical-techniques
Tendon Anchor System 510k510k

View PDF

510k
Bilateral Achilles Tendon Re-attachment with Two-Hole Tendon Anchor SystemCase Study

View PDF

case-study
Tendon Anchor System: A promising new device in soft tissue attachment.White Paper

View PDF

white-paper
Tendon Anchor System IFU (English)IFU

View PDF

ifu
Evaluation of a New Device for the Reattachment of the Achilles TendonWhite Paper

View PDF

white-paper
  1. 1. Jill S. Kawalec-Carroll, PhD. Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine. (2014). Evaluation of a New Device for the Reattachment of the Achilles Tendon. Unpublished raw data.
  2. 2. Mode of failure for rotator cuff repair with suture anchors identified at revision surgery. Cummins, Craig A. et al. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery , Volume 12 , Issue 2 , 128 - 133

* BioPro Tendon Anchor System Clinical Evluation Report

Clover Staple

2021-09-14T15:00:45+00:00

Clover Staple™

System Overview

The BioPro® Clover Staple is a 3-leg and 4-leg nitinol memory-alloy staple specially designed for intercarpal fusions. The Clover Staple activates at patient body temperature providing dynamic, centralized compression designed to speed up the fusion process.

Clinical Benefits

Centralized Compression

Nitinol memory alloy offers compression at patient body temperature. When activated both the legs and top dimensions compress, generating centralized compression. 

Low Profile

The profile is only 1mm thick, allowing for minimal bone resection to maintain fusion mass and minimize radial impingement.

Versatile

Available in both 3 and 4-leg designs with 9 sizes each. 

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Resources

TitleTypeDocument Linkdoc_type_hfilter
Clover Staple BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
Clover Staple Surgical TechniqueSurgical Technique

View PDF

surgical-techniques
Clover Staple 510k510k

View PDF

510k
Clover Staple Technology OverviewBrochure

View PDF

brochure
Low-Profile Staple Successful in Small Bone FusionWhite Paper

View PDF

white-paper
Limited Wrist Fusion Using a New Memory StapleWhite Paper

View PDF

white-paper
Clover Staple IFU (English)IFU

View PDF

ifu
Clover Staple IFU (Canadian French)IFU

View PDF

ifu

Modular Thumb Implant

2021-08-06T13:50:15+00:00

Modular Thumb Implant

A clinically proven CMC joint implant solution.1

System Overview

The BioPro Modular Thumb Implant is a two-piece implant consisting of a head and a press-fit plasma-sprayed stem designed to replace an arthritic carpometacarpal (CMC) joint.

Clinical Benefits

Clinically Proven

The BioPro Modular Thumb Implant is a clinically proven joint replacement option, with 94% implant survivorship at 6-years.1

Preserves Trapezium

There are numerous benefits associated with preserving the trapezium including maintaining thumb length, improved cosmetic appearance, and easy revision to LRTI if necessary.1

Faster Recovery

Data shows the Modular Thumb Implant offers faster recovery than traditional LRTI surgery.1

Return of Strength

Data shows the return of strength to the same or greater level than the nonoperative thumb.2

Patient-Specific Fit

The two-piece, modular design allows the head sizing to match the anatomy of the trapezium and the stem sizing to match the metacarpal. A total of 48 implant size configurations are available with the standard heads and stems.

High Patient Satisfaction

Patients previously treated with both LRTI and joint replacement prefer their joint replacement and 97% of overall patients are satisfied with the procedure.1

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Implant Options

3 Head Offsets (Neck Lengths)

4 Head Diameters

4 Stem Sizes

Resources

TitleTypeDocument Linkdoc_type_hfilter
Modular Thumb IFU (English)IFU

View PDF

ifu
Modular Thumb 510k510k

View PDF

510k
Modular Thumb Surgical TechniqueSurgical Technique

View PDF

surgical-techniques
Modular Thumb BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
A Promising Thumb Basal Joint Hemiarthroplasty for Treatment of Trapeziometacarpal OsteoarthritisPublication

View PDF

publication
Modular Thumb IFU (Canadian French)IFU

View PDF

ifu
Hemiarthroplasty Successfully TreatsThumb Basilar ArthritisWhite Paper

View PDF

white-paper
  1. James W. Pritchett MD, Louis S. Habryl DO. A Promising Thumb Basal Joint Hemiarthroplasty for Treatment of Trapeziometacarpal Osteoarthritis. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. April 2012
  2. John Faillace MD. Hemiarthroplasty Successfully Treats Thumb Basilar Arthritis. Presented at the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons 2017 Annual Meeting.

Effi+Pro

2021-08-06T12:59:59+00:00

Effi+Pro®

System Overview

The Effi+Pro® is a sterile packed, single-use device designed for manual compression and distraction during orthopedic procedures. With over 100mm of movement available, the Effi+Pro allows the surgeon to quickly switch from distraction to compression without changing or repositioning the device. The fine threaded design allows for incremental distraction and compression adjustment, ensuring proper positioning.

Clinical Benefits

  • Compression and distraction without repositioning
  • Single use, sterile packages include 6 mounting pins 
  • 100mm of available distraction/compression
  • Fine thread design allows infinitely adjustable distraction or compression
  • Lightweight design

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Resources

TitleTypeDocument Linkdoc_type_hfilter
Effi+Pro BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
Effi+Pro IFU (English)IFU

View PDF

ifu

Accu-Cut Osteotomy Guide System

2021-08-05T20:03:27+00:00

Accu-Cut® Osteotomy Guide System

Accurate and consistent hallux valgus correction.1

System Overview

The Accu-Cut® Osteotomy Guide System is a disposable, sterile packaged system that includes a guide, two universal saw blades, and two 0.045 double trocar K-wires. Guides are available for the most popular distal metatarsal osteotomies to address mild to moderate hallux valgus deformity.

Clinical Benefits

Precise Cuts

Using an Accu-Cut Guide in conjunction with your preferred osteotomy ensures precision with all cuts for optimal bone contact and improved fusion success.1

Sterile Packaged

The sterile packed system provides the surgeon with everything needed to perform the desired osteotomy.

Multiple Plane Correction

Accu-Cut Guides allow surgeons to transpose the metatarsal head in multiple planes. Depending on the guide, surgeons can plantarflex, rotate and transpose laterally.

Choose Your Guide

STANDARD CHEVRON

OVERVIEW
55° angle cut for lateral transposition
GUIDE OPTIONS
1
KIT CONTENTS
(1) Guide, (2) saw blades, (2) k-wires

LONG-ARM CHEVRON

OVERVIEW
44° cut with long dorsal arm for lateral transposition
GUIDE OPTIONS
1
KIT CONTENTS
(1) Guide, (2) saw blades, (2) k-wires

YOUNGSWICK

OVERVIEW
Dorsal slots at 1mm, 2mm, or 3mm spacing to shorten and plantarflex with lateral transposition
GUIDE OPTIONS
3 (1, 2 or 3mm options with one guide per kit)
KIT CONTENTS
(1) Guide, (2) saw blades, (2) k-wires

SCARF

OVERVIEW
"Z" shaped guide with multiple slots for multiple plane correction
GUIDE OPTIONS
2 (short and long included in the kit)
KIT CONTENTS
(2) Guides, (2) saw blades, (2) k-wires

DMAA

OVERVIEW
 Chevron guide, with a second dorsal slot, angled at 10°, that allows for lateral transposition plus rotation of the head
GUIDE OPTIONS
2 (left and right guides included in the kit)
KIT CONTENTS
(2) Guides, (2) saw blades, (2) k-wires

2-Stage

OVERVIEW
Two-stage system that starts with standard Chevron guide, then a 5°, 10°, or 15° cut for rotation along with lateral transposition
GUIDE OPTIONS
4 (all guides are included in the kit)
KIT CONTENTS
(4) Guides, (2) saw blades, (2) k-wires

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Resources

TitleTypeDocument Linkdoc_type_hfilter
Accu-Cut Osteotomy Guide Surgical TechniqueSurgical Technique

View PDF

surgical-techniques
Accu-Cut Osteotomy Guide System BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
Evaluation of surgical experience and the use of an osteotomy guide on the apical angle of an Austin osteotomyPublication

View PDF

publication
Accu-Cut Osteotomy Guide System IFU (English)IFU

View PDF

ifu
Accu-Cut Osteotomy Guide System IFU (Canadian French)IFU

View PDF

ifu
Accu-Cut Osteotomy Guide Value Analysis GuideValue Analysis Guide

View PDF

value-analysis-guide
  1. Hetherington VJ, Kawalec-Carroll JS, Melillo-Kroleski J, Jones T, Melillo M, McFarland N, Blazer M, Favazzo JA. Evaluation of surgical experience and the use of an osteotomy guide on the apical angle of an Austin osteotomy. Foot (Edinb). 2008 Sep;18(3):159-64. doi: 10.1016/j.foot.2008.01.008. Epub 2008 Apr 2. PMID: 20307431.

Digital Compression Screw

2021-08-06T12:58:36+00:00

Digital Compression Screw (D.C.S)

System Overview

The Digital Compression Screw (D.C.S.) is a solid, stainless steel screw specifically designed to address digital fusions. The 1.5mm and 1.8mm diameters range from 20mm to 55mm in length, allowing for fusion of the DIPJ, PIPJ, or both.

Clinical Benefits

Stability and Compression

The lag design combined with a unique over-drilling technique allows for compression across the fusion site. The threads purchase into cortical bone, improving stability and reducing the chance of rotation or residual flexion.

Buried Fixation

Unlike traditional k-wire fixation, the DCS is buried beneath the skin, allowing for patients to wear a stiff-soled postoperative shoe. After fusion is achieved, the technique allows for simple in-office screw removal.

Fusion of DIPJ and PIPJ

Unlike intramedullary fixation devices, the DCS allows for fusion of both the DIPJ and PIPJ reducing the chance of mallet toe.

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Resources

TitleTypeDocument Linkdoc_type_hfilter
Digital Compression Screw IFU (English)IFU

View PDF

ifu
Digital Compression Screw Surgical TechniqueSurgical Technique

View PDF

surgical-techniques
Digital Compression Screw BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
Digital Compression Screw 510k510k

View PDF

510k

Horizon Subtalar

2021-08-06T13:02:16+00:00

Horizon® Subtalar Implant

System Overview

The BioPro Horizon® Subtalar Implant is used for the treatment of flexible flatfoot and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction in both children and adults. 

Clinical Benefits

Restores Alignment

Implanted within the sinus tarsi, it is designed to block excessive pronation and elevate the talus while allowing subtalar joint motion.1

Minimally Invasive and Reversible

If correction or pain relief is not achieved, the implant may be removed through a small incision.1

Quick Recovery

Subtalar arthroreisis allows for quick recovery and pain relief compared to other surgical interventions.1

Preventing further Arthrosis

A smooth lateral surface ensures both the talus and calcaneus interface with a smooth surface during pronation. The slight taper stabilizes the implant during pronation and protects against lateral migration.

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Resources

TitleTypeDocument Linkdoc_type_hfilter
Horizon Subtalar BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
Horizon Subtalar Surgical TechniqueSurgical Technique

View PDF

surgical-techniques
Symptomatic flexible flatfoot in adults: subtalar arthroereisisPublication

View Study

publication
Horizon Subtalar 510k510k

View PDF

510k
Horizon Subtalar IFU (Multi Language)IFU

View PDF

ifu
Horizon Subtalar Hybrid IFU (English)IFU

View PDF

ifu
  1. Ozan F, Doğar F, Gençer K, Koyuncu, Vatansever F, Duygulu F, Altay T. Symptomatic flexible flatfoot in adults: subtalar arthroereisis. Ther Clin Risk Manag. 2015;11:1597-1602
    https://doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S90649

Memory Staple

2021-08-06T13:03:19+00:00

Memory Staple

A body heat-activated staple for continuous compression.

System Overview

The BioPro Memory Staple is a nitinol memory-alloy staple designed to provide fast and stable fixation in a variety of procedures. The staple provides dynamic compression designed to facilitate bone healing.1

Clinical Benefits

Dynamic Compression

Generates dynamic compressive forces that increase over time which allows the staple to adapt to changes in joint, fracture, or osteotomy site due to resorption, movement, or bone remodeling.1 Our unique S-bridge design ensures even compression across the fusion site.

Reduce Time and Cost

Easy to use instrumentation for fast and direct visual insertion may reduce procedure time. Convenient reusable kits reduce procedure costs compared to expensive disposable instrumentation.

Versatile Design and Implantation

17 standard sizes with varying bridge widths, leg lengths, and wire sizes, allowing fixation in most hand or foot procedures. Body-heat activated design offers delayed compression, ensuring proper seating and positioning of the staple prior to compression.

Staple Sizes

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Resources

TitleTypeDocument Linkdoc_type_hfilter
Memory Staple Surgical TechniqueSurgical Technique

View PDF

surgical-techniques
Memory Staple BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
Memory Staple 510k510k

View PDF

510k
Memory Staple IFU (English)IFU

View PDF

ifu
Memory Staple IFU (Canadian French)IFU

View PDF

ifu
Memory Staple Value Analysis Resource GuideValue Analysis Guide

View PDF

value-analysis-guide
  1. T.J. Chang and B.D. Overley, “An In Vitro Comparative Study of Screw and Nitinol Staple Compression: A Model Showing Active ‘Dynamic’ Compression,” Presented at the American College of Foot & Ankle Surgeons 65th Annual Scientific Conference, Orlando, FL, March 2007.

Bone Bank Allografts

2021-08-06T13:51:50+00:00

Bone Bank Allografts

  • SteriFuse® Crunch™ consists of SteriFuse® DBM putty with cortical cancellous bone chips
  • SteriFuse® DBM Putty - Made from 100% demineralized human bone
  • SteriScaf® Cortical Bone Fibers - Interwoven demineralized bone fibers provide a unique scaffold for bone formation
  • SteriGraft® Cortical-Cancellous Crushed available in 5cc, 10cc, 15cc and 30cc
  • SteriGraft® Cancellous Crushed available in 5cc, 10cc, 15cc and 30cc

Additional SteriGraft® include Illium Tricortical Block, Cortical Cancellous Strut, Patella Block, Cortical Plate, Fibula Shaft, Femoral Head, Hemi Patellar Tendon, Whole Patellar Tendon with or without Quad, Pre-Shaped Patellar Tendon, Achilles Tendon with and without Bone Block, Pre-Shaped Achilles Tendon, Gracilis Tendon, Semitendinosus Tendon, Tibialis Tendon Anterior, Tibialis Tendon Posterior, Peroneus Longus Tendon, Plantaris Tendon, Fascia Lata, Pericardium, and more.

BioPro is an authorized distributor for Bone Bank Allografts 

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


PalinGen Membrane

2021-08-06T13:53:16+00:00

PalinGen® Membranes

PalinGen Membrane, Hydromembrane, X-Plus Membrane, and X-Plus Hydromembrane are amniotic membrane grafts that provide a wound covering and support for native tissues.

  • Allografts may be sutured, glued, or simply positioned based on clinician preference
  • Allografts may be trimmed to any desired size and shape
  • Easily resorbed in vivo
  • Chorion free
  • Available in a variety of sizes: 1x1cm up to 8x8cm
  • Recommended storage is in a clean, dry environment at ambient temperature until expiration
  • Membranes may be refrigerated

BioPro is an authorized distributor for Amnio Technology 

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Thumb Arthritis

2020-08-24T19:18:43+00:00

The BioPro Modular Thumb Implant

6-year follow-up of 143 thumbs showed 94% implant survivorship[1]

1498181816_33.Thumbs-Up

99.3% good or excellent cosmetic appearance[1]

1498250131_fingers-rotate

Improved pinch and grip strength[1]

Basal thumb arthritis, often referred to as CMC joint arthritis or simply thumb joint arthritis, can be very disabling, causing severe hand pain and swelling, as well as decreased strength and range of motion. A painful, arthritic thumb may make it difficult to complete many daily household tasks such as turning a doorknob or opening a jar.

Luckily there are solutions out there for you. Many treatment options exist for thumb joint arthritis. The following page discusses some common options as well as an alternative treatment option, known as implant arthroplasty. The BioPro Modular Thumb Implant is a device that is implanted in the base of your thumb, allowing patients suffering from thumb pain to regain range of motion while providing a firm foundation for grip strength and pain relief.

What is thumb arthritis?

Base of thumb arthritis, eps8

Normally in a joint, cartilage covers the ends of bones and creates a shock absorber to allow pain-free movement. With arthritis, the cartilage deteriorates, which results in contact between the bones. This produces pain and eventually deformity. We are discussing arthritis of the base of the thumb. This is the most common site of arthritis in the hand. The joint, also called the carpometacarpal or CMC joint, is a saddle shaped joint that allows the thumb to have a wide range of motions. This gives you the ability to pinch and grab things. CMC joint arthritis may make it difficult to accomplish many everyday tasks.

Who gets it?

Arthritis of the base of the thumb is more commonly seen in women over the age of 40. It is a fairly common problem that happens to around 7% of men and 15% of women. There are conservative treatments, but many arthritic thumb cases commonly requires surgery.

What are the symptoms?

The most common symptom of CMC joint arthritis is pain at the base of the thumb. It often becomes difficult to do everyday tasks, such as opening jars, turning door knobs or writing. The pain can become so severe that you may experience pain at night when sleeping. In more severe cases destruction and mal-alignment of the joint occurs, and a bump develops. If you start to experience these symptoms you may want to consult your doctor, who can advise you on the best option to treat your discomfort. They will diagnose you by a physical evaluation as well as X-rays of your hand. X-rays are used to confirm the diagnosis, although the severity of your arthritis cannot always be determined with x-ray findings.

Treatment Options

Conservative Treatment Options – What Happens First

Once diagnosed with thumb arthritis, your doctor may offer you many different treatment options. They will most likely start with conservative treatments such as anti-inflammatories or cortisone injections. These treatments may alleviate your symptoms and help reduce pain for a short period of time, however in most instances they will not completely resolve the problem. If these treatments do not help your pain your doctor may refer you to a surgeon to discuss your discomfort.

Surgical Treatment Options

Once conservative treatment is no longer effective , your doctor may recommend surgery. Below are the most common surgical procedures used to treat CMC arthritis.

Trapezial Resection with Ligament Reconstruction

Trapezial resection with ligament reconstruction goes by a number of different names, Anchovy, LRTI or TMIA. This procedure involves full or partial removal of the arthritic bone at the base of the CMC joint (the trapezium). A series of small cuts are made in the forearm to split a tendon, which is moved to the base of the thumb to fill in the area from which the trapezium bone was removed. The thumb now rests on a soft tendon pillow, not a hard piece of arthritic bone (which is painful). Immobilization for a LRTI’s is six weeks and mobility after surgery will be limited. The cosmetics of your hand also may be altered. Should this procedure fail, there are not many good treatment options remaining. The only real revision option is to harvest another tendon and try the procedure again.

Fusion

During a fusion, the two arthritic bones are attached together via a screw or plate. The bones will then grow together, eliminating painful bone-on-bone contact, but also eliminating any motion at that joint. Fusion is frequently unacceptable to many patients because of the loss of movement in the joint. Additionally, fusion often leads to arthritis in adjacent joints as these joints become over used once the thumb joint is fused. After a fusion is completed you will be immobilized for 6 to 8 weeks. You will completely lose mobility and the cosmetics of your hand may also be altered.If a fusion fails, revision options include trapezial resection with ligament reconstruction as well as implant arthroplasty.

Implant Arthroplasty

A portion of the bone in the base of the thumb metacarpal is removed and the implant is placed in the space from the damaged joint. A new socket that provides a smooth surface for the implant to move in is formed. Your hand is then placed in a cast which keeps the thumb joint in a specific position while your healing begins. You will be in a cast for approximately 3 weeks, depending on your healing. The treatment we are discussing is called an Interpositional Arthroplasty. This procedure has the advantage of maintaining movement and a firm foundation for pinch and grip strength. If implant arthroplasty fails, revision options include trapezial resection with ligament reconstruction as well as fusion.

The BioPro Modular Implant Option

The BioPro® Modular Thumb Implant provides relief for arthritis in the metacarpal-trapezium joint. The implant, which is made in Michigan U.S.A, comes in four stem sizes and 12 head sizes for a customized fit. It has plasma spray on the stem for bone in-growth. This procedure has the advantage of maintaining movement and a firm foundation for pinch and grip strength. It also minimizes frequent complications of other procedures, such as dislocations, material failure, and complicated invasive soft tissue reconstructions.

The Implant’s History

The BioPro® Thumb Implant has been used successfully for almost 20 years. Originally manufactured as a one piece implant, it was designed in 1996 by Charles Townley, MD, the founder of BioPro. In the early 2000′s the original one piece design was evaluated and, with the help of Dr. Louis Habryl, the Modular Implant was created in 2004. In addition to the implant, simple instrumentation was developed, making the procedure easily reproducible. There are other thumb implants available on the market, but none have the long-term, peer-reviewed clinical data supporting their use like the BioPro® Modular Thumb Implant.

Clinically Proven

A study published in May 2012 in Clinical Orthopedics and Related Research, featured the use of the BioPro Modular Thumb Implant for treatment of trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis. The study included 159 basal joint hemiarthroplasties to treat osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint. Of that, 143 thumbs were available for review. Pain relief occurred in 135 thumbs, function improved in 138 thumbs, 139 thumbs were excellent or good in overall assessment, and 142 thumbs had good or excellent cosmetic appearance. The mean postoperative Buck-Gramcko Score was 49(excellent) and the implant showed a 94% survivorship at a mean follow up of 72.1 months. If you would like to view the full study, use our contact form to request a copy.

What Happens During And After Surgery

The bone in the base of the thumb is removed and the implant replaces the damaged joint. A new socket that provides a smooth surface for the implant to move in is formed. Your hand is then placed in a cast that keeps the thumb joint in a specific position while your healing begins. You will be in a cast for approximately 2—4 weeks, depending on your healing. After your cast is removed, you may have hand therapy to regain your strength and motion. Most patients have unrestricted activity 8—12 weeks after surgery. The BioPro Modular Thumb implant is intended to treat localized basal thumb (CMC or carpometacarpal) joint arthritis. The Modular Thumb implant is not recommended for patients who in addition to basal thumb arthritis, have arthritis in adjacent joints, such as the trapezium/scaphoid joint. If considering the BioPro Modular Thumb implant consult your doctor today to see if this treatment is right for you.

In some rare cases, you may experience some minor discomfort for several months after surgery while the bone remolds and the hand adjusts to the implant. If you experience this pain you should consult your physician to ensure that the pain is not a more serious issue.

Learn more about basal thumb arthritis at www.arthritisofthethumb.com

F.A.Q's

Most patients with localized basal thumb joint arthritis are candidates for the BioPro Modular Thumb Implant, but only your surgeon can make the final determination. If your arthritis has spread to adjacent joints in the hand, you would not be a candidate for the implant.
Yes, most insurance plans cover this procedure. It is important to get a pre-authorization from your insurance company prior to surgery.

• This procedure has the advantage of maintaining movement and a firm foundation for pinch and grip strength.
• Thumb mobility is almost normal and appearance of the hand remains normal.
• It minimizes frequent complications of other procedures such as dislocations, material failure, and complicated invasive soft tissue reconstructions.

Every surgery is unique, however published clinical study shows the success rate of the BioPro Modular Thumb Implant at 94%. If you would like a copy of that study, contact us today.
You will be immobilized for 4-6 weeks, depending on your healing. After that, you may have therapy to regain your strength and motion. Most patients have unrestricted activity 8-12 weeks after surgery. A small portion of patients may have some residual pain for up to a year after the procedure as your body adapts to the implant.
There are many surgeons located around the U.S that currently use the BioPro Modular Thumb Implant. If you would like contact information on surgeons near you, fill out the contact form to the right and one of our customer service agents will be happy to give you the information.
Surgeons in different areas of the country are often exposed to different methods in training and become comfortable with specific procedures they utilize, especially if they are getting good results and their patients are happy. It is possible they are just unaware of the implant, or they just may not be ready to switch from their current preferred procedure.

The information provided is offered for general education purposes only and should not be used for diagnosing orthopedic problems, nor should it be considered a replacement for consultation with a physician. Only your healthcare provider can diagnose you and treat you in the way best suitable for you. While BioPro has endeavored to make sure the information contained in this site is accurate, BioPro can not guarantee the accuracy of such information, and it is provided without warrant or guarantee of any kind. If you have any questions or concerns about your health, please contact your healthcare provider.

References

Pritchett MD,  Habryl DO. A Promising Thumb Basal Joint Hemiarthroplasty for Treatment of Trapeziometacarpal Osteoarthritis. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2012

Painful Great Toe

2021-08-10T17:38:05+00:00

Understanding Painful Great Toe

Pain in the great toe, otherwise known as the first metatarsophalangeal joint, can be caused by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, bone spurs, bunions and posttraumatic injuries.

Hallux limitus and hallux rigidus are terms used to describe the loss of motion in the first metatarsophalangeal joint with hallux rigidus being considered the end stage of hallux limitus. This is a challenging problem that can affect patients of all ages and activity levels. The majority of cases appear to be mechanically induced and are often associated with a long first metatarsal and fallen arch foot types. However, trauma such as a stubbing injury may also result in hallux limitus. Long-standing gout can be a contributing factor as well.

Osteoarthritis (OA), also known as degenerative arthritis, is the most common type of arthritis and usually develops slowly over several years. It occurs when there is a systematic loss of cushioning cartilage in the joints and the bones in the joint rub against one another; this can be very painful and reduce movement drastically in the joint. If the condition is not treated, the bones could overgrow and fuse together on their own causing a complete loss of function.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that causes chronic inflammation of the joints. A typical joint in the body is made up of bones that move against each other and are held together by ligaments and a sheath (called a capsule) that surrounds the entire joint. The inner lining of the capsule is called the synovium. In rheumatoid arthritis, the synovium of the joint becomes inflamed and enlarged, eroding the neighboring bones, ligaments, and cartilage. The end result is damaged and painful joint surfaces.

Osteophytes, or bone spurs, are bony projections that form along joints. They are due to arthritis or damage of the joint, and they may limit joint movement and cause pain.

A bunion is an enlargement of bone or tissue around the joint at the base of the big toe. It is a condition caused by abnormal mechanics of the foot or congenital factors, such as flat feet, abnormal bone structure, and neurological conditions. The end of the large toe, or the phalange, points toward the second toe causing the metatarsal to bump, or bow outward.

Learn more about hallux rigidus and the BioPro Hemi. 

Symptoms

Common symptoms of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, bone spurs, and/or a bunion are:

  • Pain experienced when walking
  • Joint tenderness
  • Inflammation that may produce a mild warm feeling or occasional redness
  • Significant stiffness of the toe
  • Loss of function

Treatments

Before considering surgery there are always non-operative treatments such as:

  • Shoe modifications
  • Cast immobilization with a reduction in activity
  • Anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Physical therapy
  • Local injections

When non-operative solutions are no longer able to control the pain and disability, surgery becomes a reasonable option. Surgical options include:

Keller Arthroplasty

The base of the phalanx and the attached tendons are severed and approximately 1/3 to 1/2 of the phalange is removed. This decompresses the joint and allows soft tissue to in-grow. Complications may include flail toe, which is where the toe sticks up in the air, and a return of pain as there is still the potential for bone on bone contact.

Cheilectomy

Bone spurs on the top of the metatarsal head that interfere with movement are removed, thus allowing joint motion. Along with the Keller arthroplasty, a cheilectomy is simply the removal of bone without resurfacing the joint. The possibility of having bone on bone or diseased/damaged cartilage post surgery is still a concern.

Arthrodesis (Fusion)

The cartilage surfaces of the joint are removed and a device such as a screw or plate is utilized to prevent motion. The bones eventually grow together which prevents pain; however, a loss of function occurs as the joint will no longer bend. With this loss of motion, your gait, or way of walking, may change, which could affect other joints such as knees, hips, spine, etc. Additionally, shoe wear selection may be limited due to the inability to bend your toe.

Hemi-Joint Arthroplasty

The surface of the metatarsal head is reshaped and the phalange is resurfaced with a new, smooth-surfaced component. This eliminates the possibility of bone on bone contact, thereby reducing pain, while restoring motion and maintaining function of the toe. Great toe joint replacement is usually performed to treat severe arthritis conditions. Most patients with a great toe joint prosthesis are middle-aged and older, but the operation may be performed on younger patients at the discretion of the surgeon. Though motion and function should be restored, achieving the normal movement of a completely healthy joint may not be possible.

How the BioPro Hemi Toe Implant Works

The BioPro Hemi Toe Implant treats the arthritic joint by resurfacing the phalanx (low force, non-weight-bearing joint side) with a smooth, durable metal implant for the metatarsal head to articulate against. Watch the surgical animation below.

Why it Works

Many factors allow the implant to provide improved range of motion, pain-relief and long-term survivorship.1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13

Improved range of motion

During the surgical procedure, large osteophytes (bony outgrowths) are removed and the joint is smoothed out. This, along with minimal bone resection, allows for decompression of the joint and improved range of motion.

Pain relief

Before surgery, the joint had damaged cartilage or was bone on bone. After surgery, there is a remodeled metatarsal head articulating against a smooth metal spacer allowing for reduced pain and restored motion.

Long-term survivorship

Since the implant is placed on the phalanx, it avoids the weight-bearing forces placed on the metatarsal head. Furthermore, the implants outer edge rests on hard cortical bone, preventing the implant from receding into the soft cancellous bone. The implant is manufactured from a well established biocompatible material with a durable wear surface that is proven to last over 30 years.7

How big is the implant?

The implant is very similar in both thickness and diameter to a US coin. It is 2mm thick and available in diameters from 17mm to 23mm depending on a patient’s anatomy.

Why resurface only the phalanx?

While walking or running the foot goes through a “gait cycle”. The cycle involves six main phases: heel strike, foot flat, mid stance, heel off, midswing, and toe off. Although the big toe joint is not a direct weight-bearing joint, during heel off and toe off, the metatarsal head is subject to 119% of the patient’s bodyweight16. Since the BioPro Hemi is placed on the proximal phalanx it avoids this force and simply glides up (dorsiflexion) the metatarsal head.

Long-term data

A 40 year review of the BioPro First MPJ Hemi Implant was conducted and then published in 1994. The study included 279 patients ranging from 8 months to 33 years postoperative.10

The patients were evaluated through questionnaires that measured pain, joint stiffness, functional disability, and overall satisfaction. They were also clinically examined for range of motion and alignment. In order to achieve “Excellent” results, the patient had to be entirely pain-free in all activities, with no functional limitation of motion and have normal alignment.

The study showed 93.1% excellent, 2.2% good, and 4.7% unsatisfactory. The study was then followed up on in 1998, in which 189 patients were added.7 The follow up on the 468 patients was conducted from 2 months to 38 years postoperative and showed a 97.3% implant survivorship. Read the full study here.

Since then, several studies have been conducted on the BioPro First MPJ Hemi Implant.

BioPro vs Fusion

A recent study was published comparing long-term results (average 8.3 years) of the BioPro implant hemiarthroplasty procedure to arthrodesis (fusion). A total of 78 procedures performed from 2005 to 2011 were reviewed (31 hemiarthroplasty and 47 fusion). The data revealed that hemiarthroplasty provided better functional outcomes with considerably more satisfied patients.13 You can read the full study here.

The following charts highlight some key findings.

What to expect after toe implant surgery

Most patients have a rapid recovery and have considerably less pain than they did before surgery. Partial to full weight-bearing is permitted at the discretion of the surgeon. A standard post-operative shoe may be used for the first 3 weeks. Dressings are changed for 3 weeks, with sutures usually removed at the 2 week period. Passive range of motion, such as movement of the foot upward or downward is permitted by the 2nd or 3rd post-operative week. Physical therapy and return to soft shoes are usually permitted by the 3rd to 4th post-operative week.

Note: dressing changes, return to regular shoes and types of postoperative range of motion therapies may vary based on your surgeon’s recommendations.

Possible complications after surgery include:

Infections – Any infection in your body can spread to your joint replacement. Infections may occur while you are in the hospital or after you go home. Minor infections can be treated with antibiotics, while major infections may require surgery and removal of the prosthesis.

Stiffness – In some cases, the ability to bend the toe does not return to normal after an artificial great toe joint replacement. This can be reduced with aggressive physical therapy.

FAQ's

Yes, most insurance plans cover this procedure. It is important to get a pre-authorization from your insurance company prior to surgery.

There are many surgeons located around the world that currently use the BioPro First MPJ Hemi Implant. If you would like contact information on surgeons near you, fill out the contact form to the right and one of our customer service agents will be happy to give you the information.

The fusion is considered the "Gold Standard" procedure for treating Hallux Rigidus, so many surgeons prefer this procedure. Many surgeons are not aware of the clinical studies supporting our implant. Also, there are many other implants currently on the market for surgeons to choose from, so your surgeon may be using a similar implant.

Implants manufactured from metal, such as cobalt chrome and titanium, have proven to be long-lasting and biocompatible. Some synthetic materials have been shown to break down and cause inflammation.15 Be sure to mention to your doctor if you have a Nickel allergy as cobalt chrome contains nickel and your surgeon will want to use a titanium implant.

References 

1. Timothy Voskuijl, MD, Ron Onstenk, MD. Operative Treatment for Osteoarthritis of the First Metatarsophalangeal Joint: Arthrodesis Versus Hemiarthroplasty. The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery xxx (2015) 1–4
2. Karin H. Simons, MD, Pieter van der Woude, MD, Frank W.M. Faber, MD, PhD , Paulien M. van Kampen, PhD , Bregje J.W. Thomassen, PhD. Short-Term Clinical Outcome of Hemiarthroplasty Versus Arthrodesis for End-Stage Hallux Rigidus. The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery xxx (2015) 1–4
3. Giza E, Sullivan MR. First Metatarsophalangeal Hemiarthroplasty for Grade III and IV Hallux Rigidus Techniques in Foot and Ankle Surgery 4(1):10-17,2005
4. Clement, N. D., MacDonald, D., Dall, G. F., Ahmed, I., Duckworth, A. D., Shalaby, H. S., & McKinley, J. (2016). Metallic hemiarthroplasty for the treatment of end-stage hallux rigidus. Bone Joint J, 98-B(7), 945-951.
5. Taranow, DO. et al. Contemporary Approaches to Stage II and III Hallux Rigidus: The Role of Metallic Hemiarthroplasty of the Proximal Phalanx. Foot and Ankle Clinics , Volume 10 , Issue 4 , 713 - 728
6. Roukis TS, Townley, MD. BIOPRO resurfacing endoprosthesis versus periarticular osteotomy for hallux rigidus: short-term follow-up and analysis. Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery 2003;42(6):350-8
7. Juan C. Goez, DPM, Charles O. Townley MD, Warren Taranow, DO. An Update on the Metallic Hemiarthroplasty Resurfacing Prosthesis for the Hallux. Presented at the 56th Annual Meeting and Scientific Seminar of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Orlando FL February 1998
8. Charles G. Kissel, DPM, FACFAS, Zeeshan S. Husain, DPM AACFAS, Paul H. Wooley, PhD, Michael Kruger, MS, Mark A. Schumaker, DPM, Michael Sullivan, DPM, and Todd Snoeyink, DPM. A Prospective Investigation of the Biopro® Hemi-Arthroplasty for the First Metatarsophalangeal Joint. The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery 47(6):505–509, 2008
9. Taranow, DO , Townley, MD. Metallic proximal phalangeal hemiarthroplasty for hallux rigidus. Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics 1999;9(1):33
10. Townley, MD, Taranow, DO. A metallic hemiarthroplasty resurfacing prosthesis for the hallux metatarsophalangeal joint. Foot & Ankle International 1994;15(11):575-80
11. Christine C. Salonga, DPM, David C. Novicki, DPM, FACFAS , Martin M. Pressman, DPM, FACFAS , D. Scot Malay, DPM, MSCE, FACFAS. A Retrospective Cohort Study of the BioPro Hemiarthroplasty Prosthesis. The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery 49 (2010) 331–339
12. Giza, E., Sullivan, M., Ocel, D., Lundeen, G., Mitchell, M., & Frizzell, L. (2010). First metatarsophalangeal hemiarthroplasty for hallux rigidus. International Orthopaedics, 34(8), 1193–1198. https://doi. org/10.1007/s00264-010-1012-x
13. Beekhuizen, Stefan R. et al. Long-Term Results of Hemiarthroplasty Compared With Arthrodesis for Osteoarthritis of the First Metatarsophalangeal Joint. The Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery , Volume 57 , Issue 3 , 445 - 450
14. Giza E, Sullivan M, Ocel D, Lundeen G, Mitchell M, Frizzell L. First metatarsophalangeal hemiarthroplasty for hallux rigidus. International Orthopaedics. 2010;34(8):1193-1198. doi:10.1007/s00264-010-1012-x.
15. Verhaar J, Vermeulen A, Bulstra S, et al. Bone reaction to silicone metatarsophalangeal joint-1 hemiprosthesis. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1989;245:228–232
16. Jacob HA. Forces acting in the forefoot during normal gait--an estimate. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2001 Nov;16(9):783-92. doi: 10.1016/s0268-0033(01)00070-5. PMID: 11714556.

The information provided is offered for general education purposes only and should not be used for diagnosing orthopedic problems, nor should it be considered a replacement for consultation with a physician. Only your healthcare provider can diagnose you and treat you in the way best suitable for you. While BioPro has endeavored to make sure the information contained in this site is accurate, BioPro can not guarantee the accuracy of such information, and it is provided without warrant or guarantee of any kind. If you have any questions or concerns about your health, please contact your healthcare provider.

Wrist Arthritis

2020-08-20T16:55:08+00:00

Understanding Wrist Arthritis

The main two types of arthritis in the wrist are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis and is also known as degenerative arthritis. OA usually develops slowly over several years. It occurs when there is a systematic loss of cushioning cartilage in the joints and the bones in the joint rub against one another. This can be very painful and reduce movement drastically in the joint.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that causes chronic inflammation of the joints. A typical joint in the body is made up of bones that move against each other. These two bones are held together by ligaments and a sheath (called a capsule) that surrounds the entire joint. The inner lining of the capsule is called the synovium. In rheumatoid arthritis, the synovium of the joint becomes inflamed and enlarged so that it erodes the neighboring bones, ligaments, and cartilage. The end result is damaged and painful joint surfaces.

Arthritis forms in the wrist from multiple causes, but most commonly due to either a bad sprain or a fractured scaphoid that doesn’t heal properly. It will weaken your wrist and you will have difficulty bearing weight across the wrist.

 

Symptoms

Some first signs of wrist arthritis are:

  • Difficulty bearing weight on wrist
  • Pain in the wrist
  • Progressive weakness of the wrist
  • Stiffness in the wrist

These symptoms may make it difficult to complete simple daily tasks such as opening a jar or holding a coffee cup.

 

Treatments

If diagnosed with wrist arthritis your doctor would typically start with conservative, non-surgical treatments that include:

  • NSAIDS
  • Wrist splinting
  • Corticosteroid injections

When non-surgical treatments are no longer effective, your doctor may recommend surgery. Surgical options include:

Joint replacement: This is where a portion of the damaged bone is removed and replaced with a metal or plastic implant.

Removal of arthritic bone: This procedure, referred to as a Proximal Row Carpectomy or PRC, involves the removal of the scaphoid, lunate and triquetral bones, eliminating the arthritic surfaces. Potential problems include shortening of the wrist and loss of grip strength.

Joint fusion: The arthritic joints within the wrist are fused together, eliminating the bone on bone contact that causes pain. This does affect the flexibility of your wrist somewhat, but maintains wrist length and grip strength.

Fusion Options: There are multiple options for fusions within the wrist. The procedure best suited for you will be determined by which of your joints are arthritic, the extent of the damage, and your surgeon’s preference. Popular options include the 4-Corner Fusion, which fuses the lunate, capitate, hamate and triquetral; as well as the STT Fusion, which fuses the scaphoid, trapezium and trapezoid.

 

Why the BioPro Clover Staple?

The BioPro® Clover Staple is an excellent option for fusions within the wrist. It is available in three and four-leg versions, allowing surgeons to fuse either three or four bones with one device. The Clover Staple is made from Nitinol, which is a memory alloy that compresses when exposed to normal body temperature. The device is designed to continually compress the bones against each other, helping speed the healing process. Additionally, the device is very low profile, allowing for minimal bone removal without affecting wrist motion.

 

What to expect during and after surgery

After the joints are prepared for fusion, the Clover Staple is implanted, compressing all of the bones together. After the procedure, a splint or cast will be applied to restrict motion while the wrist heals. Post-operative protocols including physical therapy will be prescribed at the discretion of your surgeon. Healing times vary based on multiple factors, but typically range from 6-8 weeks.

Knee Pain

2019-07-23T18:52:34+00:00

Understanding Knee Pain

The knee is a complex, hinged joint. With support from cartilage, ligaments, and muscles, the two bones at the joint move over each other so you can straighten and bend your leg. A knee that becomes stiff and painful may be replaced with a knee prosthesis, which will allow you to walk without pain.

In a healthy knee , the surfaces of the thigh and shin bones are smooth so they can glide easily over each other. Cartilage covers the bones evenly, allowing smooth movement. Protected by the kneecap and held in place by muscles and ligaments, the joint bends freely.

In a problem knee, the surfaces of the bones may become rough, causing pain when they rub together. The cartilage may wear away, becoming rough and no longer allowing easy movement of the joint bones. Because of arthritis, the joint may be swollen and inflamed, resulting in stiffness and pain.

Your damaged knee joint can be replaced with new, smoothly surfaced components. The lower knee component will replace the rough surface of the shin bone, while the upper knee component will replace the surface of the thigh bone. The kneecap component will cover the underside of your kneecap.

 

Symptoms

Knee arthritis symptoms progessivly worsen over time. A painful knee can keep you from doing the things you enjoy in your life. The most common symptoms of knee arthritis are:

  • Stiffness of the knee
  • Swelling of the joint
  • Pain in the knee
  • Limited range of motion
  • Tenderness along the joint

 

Treatments

One solution is a decision to replace your knee and is your first step toward regaining control of your life. Technical advances have given us new materials to replace your problem knee. Therefore, when lesser methods are no longer able to control the pain and disability to your satisfaction, knee replacement becomes a reasonable option.

  • Pain is severe enough to restrict work, recreation, and the ordinary daily activities.
  • Pain is not relieved by anti-inflammatory medicine, the use of a cane, and other restricting devices.
  • There is a significant stiffness of the knee.
  • X-rays show advanced arthritis or other knee problems.

Knee replacement is an elective operation and there are always nonoperative alternatives. The decision to have the operation is not made by your doctor, but by yourself. The doctor may recommend the operation; however, your decision must be based upon weighing the benefits of the operation against the risks. You may wish to discuss the surgery with your own doctor or even get another opinion so all your questions are answered before you decide to have the operation.

 

Why the BioPro Knee Implant?

The BioPro® TKO (Total Knee Origin) implant is one of the more conservative knee implants available today. The TKO not only conserves bone by being one of the thinnest implants, but is one of the only implants that conserves all of the normal structures that Mother Nature put in place for very good reasons. The TKO retains all ligaments, including the ACL and PCL, restoring your post-operative knee to a more natural acting and responsive state.

 

The Surgical Procedure

Knee replacement is one of the most common forms of total joint replacements. To begin the surgical procedure, the patient will be given an anesthetic (usually a spinal unless contraindicated). The surgeon will then make an incision and prepare the knee for implantation of the prostheses by reshaping and resurfacing the bones of the arthritic knee joint. The surgeon will then place and secure the implants in the appropriate areas to replace the joints. Ultimately, the damaged and rough surfaces of the knee joint will be replaced with new, smooth-surfaced components. The lower knee component will replace the roughened surface of the shin bone. The upper knee component replaces the roughened surface of the thigh bone. The kneecap component covers the underside of your kneecap. When the surgery is finished, the incision will be closed and a small tube (called a hemovac) will be placed in the incision to help drain fluid from the operative area for the first day or so.

 

Complications of Knee Replacement Surgery

 

Most complications that occur after knee replacement are successfully treatable. Possible complications after knee replacement include:

 

Infections: Any infection in your body can spread to your joint replacement. Infections may occur while you are in the hospital of after you go home. Minor infections can be treated with antibiotics, while major infections may require surgery and removal of the prosthesis.

 

Blood Clots: If there is a severe pain and / or swelling that develops in your calf or thigh, you may have developed a blood clot. Blood clots result from several factors, including decreased mobility that causes a slow movement of the blood through your leg’s veins. Your doctor may take preventative action to reduce the possibility of blood clots, such as blood thinning medications, elastic stockings, exercises that increase the blood flow in the leg muscles, or plastic boots that inflate with air to compress the muscles in your legs.

 

Loosening: Loosening of the prosthesis within the bone may occur after knee replacement. If the loosening is significant and there is a large amount of pain, a revision surgery to correct the loosening may be necessary.

 

Wear: Wear can be found in several joint replacements. Excessive wear can lead to loosening and pain and may require revision surgery.

 

Prosthetic Breakage: Breakage of a knee replacement is extremely rare, but it can occur. If this case does occur, a revision surgery will be needed.

 

Nerve Injury: Nerves in the vicinity of the total joint replacement can be damaged during the total replacement surgery. This type of injury is not common and may often improve and/or completely recover after some time.

 

Stiffness: In some cases, the ability to bend the knee does not return to normal after an artificial knee replacement. Increased scarring after surgery can lead to an increasingly stiff knee. If this occurs, your surgeon may manipulate the knee to regain motion without injuring the joint.

 

It is also important to notify your surgeon or nurse if you experience any of the following symptoms:

 

1) Pain, soreness, swelling, or redness in the calf muscles of either leg.

2) Unexplained, increased pain in the operative area.

3) Redness, swelling, or puslike drainage from the area around the incision

4) Cough, high fever, or chills.

5) Chest pain, shortness of breath, or difficulty breathing.

 

What to Expect After Knee Replacement Surgery

After surgery, you will be taken to the Recovery Room for a period of close observation. Your blood pressure, pulse, and temperature will be monitored and close attention will be paid to the circulation and sensation in your legs and feet. Post operatively, you may have temporary nausea and vomiting due to anesthesia or medications. (Anti-nausea medication may be given to you when you are in your room to minimize nausea and vomiting.) It is also important to tell your nurse if you experience any numbness, tingling, or extreme pain in your legs or feet. When your condition is stabilized, you will be transferred to your hospital room.

When you wake up from surgery, you will rest in bed with your bandaged leg slightly raised by a pillow. A tube (called a hemovac) that may have been placed in you during surgery will drain excess fluid to keep swelling down, while an intravenous (IV) line may be used to provide fluids for nourishment, medication to prevent blood clots, and antibiotics to prevent possible infection. You may also have a catheter placed to aid in urination. To relieve pain, you can be attached to a special device that will allow you to get pain medication when you feel it is necessary.

At first, you will be restricted to ice chips and clear liquids, but your diet will be allowed to progress as your condition permits. Meanwhile, the surgeon and physical therapist will work together to set movement guidelines for you. The physical therapist may also recommend some gentle exercises that will help strengthen your new knee.

After total knee replacement surgery, it takes only a few months to regain strength and confidence in your new knee. With the help of your orthopedist and physical therapist, activities that you were not able to do before surgery can be enjoyable again.

Hip Pain

2019-07-23T18:53:18+00:00

Understanding Hip Pain

Your hip is a simple ball and socket joint, where your thigh bone joins with your pelvis. Surrounded by cartilage, muscles, and ligaments, your hip is one of your largest weight bearing joints in your body. Smooth cartilage and bone help you walk easily and without pain.

In a healthy hip, smooth cartilage covers the ends of your hip bones allowing the ball to glide easily in the socket. Smooth weight bearing surfaces allow for painless movement.

In a problem hip, the cartilage wears away and the bones rub together, becoming rough and pitted. The ball grinds in the socket when you walk, resulting in pain and stiffness.

Your damaged hip joint can be replaced with new, smoothly surfaced components. A ball will replace the worn head of your thigh bone, with a stem inserted into the bone for stability. A cup will replace the worn socket. Like a healthy hip, your prosthesis has a smooth gliding surface that will allow you to move with ease and without pain. Unlike your healthy hip, however, your prosthesis has a limited range of motion, and will need your special care after surgery.

 

Symptoms

Hip replacement is usually performed to treat severe arthritic conditions. The operation is sometimes performed for other problems such as hip fractures or aseptic necrosis. Most patients who have artificial hips are over the age of 55, but the operation is occasionally performed on younger patents as well. Circumstances vary, but generally patients are considered for hip replacements if:

  • Pain is severe enough to restrict work, recreation, and the ordinary daily activities.
  • Pain is not relieved by anti-inflammatory medicine, the use of a cane, and other restricting devices.
  • There is a significant stiffness of the hip.
  • X-rays show advanced arthritis or other hip problems

 

Treatments

When dealing with hip pain you would first start off with non-surgical procedures to help the pain. These normally don’t fix the problem but most likely with provide pain relief for a short period of time. Some non-surgical options are:

  • Rest (Ice, Compression, Elevation, Braces)
  • Physical Therapy
  • Walking Aids
  • Pain relievers
  • Cortisone Shot

After attempting the non-surgical approach and if you have not experienced results you may want to ask your doctor about hip replacement.

 

Why BioPro Hip Implants?

BioPro offers a variety of different implant solutions for hip replacement. The implants were designed by Dr Charles Townley, following his principles of “Design by Reason”. BioPro hip stems all incorporate a collared design, which helps preserve bone quality around the implant.

 

What to expect during and after surgery

Hip replacement is one of the most common forms of total joint replacement. To begin the surgical procedure, the patient will be given an anesthetic (usually a spinal unless contraindicated). The surgeon will then make an incision and prepare the hip bone for implantation of the prostheses. The surgeon will remove the rough surfaces of the bone at the joint and replace them with new smoothly surfaced implants.

Like the human hip, this artificial joint is composed of three components that fit together to form a ball and socket joint. The components of the prosthesis are the ball, stem, and cup. The ball will replace the worn upper end of the femur, while the cup will replace the worn socket in the pelvis. The stem will be inserted into the bone for stability. These components are implanted separately and then brought together. In some cases, after the incision is closed, a small tube (called a hemovac) is inserted to help drain fluids from the hip joint area for the first day or so following surgery.

Complications of Hip Replacement Surgery

Most complications that occur after hip replacement are successfully treatable. Possible complications after knee replacement include:

Infections: Any infection in your body can spread to your joint replacement. Infections may occur while you are in the hospital of after you go home. Minor infections can be treated with antibiotics, while major infections may require surgery and removal of the prosthesis.

Blood Clots: If there is a severe pain and / or swelling that develops in your calf or thigh, you may have developed a blood clot. Blood clots result from several factors, including decreased mobility that causes slow movement of blood through your leg’s veins. Your doctor may take preventative action to reduce the possibility of blood clots, such as blood thinning medications, elastic stockings, exercises that increase the blood flow in the leg muscles, or plastic boots that inflate with air to compress the muscles in your legs.

Loosening: Loosening of the prosthesis within the bone may occur after hip replacement. If the loosening is significant and there is a large amount of pain, a revision surgery to correct the loosening may be necessary.

Dislocation: Occasionally, after total hip replacement, the ball can be dislodged from the socket. In most cases, the hip can be relocated without surgery. A brace may be worn for a period of time if a dislocation occurs.

Wear: Wear occurs in all joint replacements. However, excessive wear can lead to loosening and pain and may require revision surgery.

Prosthetic Breakage: Breakage of a hip replacement is extremely rare, but it can occur. If this case does occur, a revision surgery will be needed.

Nerve Injury: Nerves in the vicinity of the total joint replacement can be damaged during the total replacement surgery. This type of injury is not common and may often improve and/or completely recover after some time.

 

Notify your surgeon or nurse if you experience any of the following symptoms:

  1. Pain, soreness, swelling, or redness in the calf muscles of either leg.
  2. Unexplained, increased pain in the operative area.
  3. Redness, swelling, or puslike drainage from the area around the incision
  4. Cough, high fever, or chills.
  5. Chest pain, shortness of breath, or difficulty breathing.

 

What to expect after surgery

After surgery, you will be taken to the Recovery Room for a period of close observation. Your blood pressure, pulse, and temperature will be monitored and close attention will be paid to the circulation and sensation in your legs and feet. Post operatively, you may have temporary nausea and vomiting due to anesthesia or medications. (Anti-nausea medication may be given to you when you are in your room to minimize nausea and vomiting.) It is also important to tell your nurse if you experience any numbness, tingling, or extreme pain in your legs or feet. When your condition is stabilized, you will be transferred to your hospital room.

A tube (called a hemovac) that may have been placed in you during surgery will drain excess fluid to keep swelling down, while an intravenous (IV) line may be used to provide fluids for nourishment, medication to prevent blood clots, and antibiotics to prevent possible infection. You may also have a catheter placed to aid in urination. To relieve pain, you can be attached to a special device that will allow you to get pain medication when you feel it is necessary.

Despite the back discomfort that some patients experience after surgery (caused by the soreness of the hip area and prolonged lack of movement), you must remember a few precautions to prevent dislocations:

1) The head of your hospital bed should not be elevated more than 70 degrees during the first few days after surgery.

2) Use a high-rise toilet.

3) Use 2-3 pillows between your legs.

4) Do not cross your legs or bend them forward 90 degrees.

At first, you will be restricted to ice chips and clear liquids, but your diet will be allowed to progress as your condition permits. Meanwhile, the surgeon and physical therapist will work together to set movement guidelines for you. The physical therapist will continue to check the strength and flexibility in your leg and hip, and your ability to stand and sit. The physical therapist may also recommend some gentle exercises that will help strengthen and increase your new hip’s range of motion.

After total hip replacement surgery, it takes only a few months to regain strength and confidence in your new hip. With the help of your orthopedist and physical therapist, activities that you were not able to do before surgery can be enjoyable again.

 

Hospital Recovery and Rehabilitation After Hip Replacement

Exercises will begin as soon as possible to help strengthen your leg muscles and increase your ability to bend your knee. Your balance may seem unsteady at first, but will improve as you progress with walking.

During your recovery period in the hospital, your recovery team’s goals are to minimize any swelling or pain caused by the surgery, and to start your gentle physical therapy exercises. Your physical therapist will initially teach you exercises that will increase your circulation and will then continue to teach you exercises that will improve your strength and increase your endurance so you can recover more quickly. Your therapist will finally teach you how to properly get out of bed, stand, sit, and walk, so you will be able to do these activities safely on your own.

 

Hammertoes

2020-08-20T16:55:54+00:00

Understanding Hammertoes

An abnormal bending of the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and/or even the 5th joint in between the phalanges is known as a hammertoe. The most common cause is due to a muscle and/or tendon imbalance due to abnormal mechanics of the foot along with congenital factors. There are two types of hammertoes:

  • Flexible hammertoes: movement is still possible at the joint. This is a milder condition and there are several treatments for this condition
  • Rigid hammertoes: the tendons become rigid and the toe can no longer be moved. This usually means surgery is needed.

 

Symptoms

Common symptoms of hammertoes are:

  • Abnormal bending of the toe
  • Pain or irritation
  • Forming of corns and calluses (build up of skin).

 

Treatments

There are always non-operative alternatives for hammertoes such as:

  • Shoe modifications
  • Splinting of the toe
  • Padding or trimming corns and calluses
  • Exercises or therapy
  • Medications

When non-operative solutions are no longer able to control the pain and disability to your satisfaction, surgery becomes a reasonable option. Surgical options include:

Joint Fusion (arthrodesis) – The cartilage surfaces of the joint are removed and a device such as a screw is utilized to prevent motion. The bones eventually grow together which prevents pain; however, a loss of function occurs as the joint will no longer bend.

Phalangeal head resection (arthroplasty) – a portion of the phalanx is removed, releasing tension on the tendons. This may be done in conjunction with or without some type of implant. Advantages include retaining motion, but may be accompanied by a flail toe and loss of stability.

Tendon Transfers – the tendons that are too tight may be cut or transferred to relieve the tension and allow the toe to straighten. While this allows motion to be retained, like the head resection it can lead to a flail toe or loss of stability.

 

Why the BioPro Digital Compression Screw?

The Digital Compression Screw is used to fuse the joint, permanently straightening it. Unlike some other options, it provides compressive forces across the bones, which speed the fusion process. The screw is also buried beneath the skin, allowing the patient to wash their feet with no exposed wires, eliminating the potential for pin track infections. The Digital Compression Screw is also easily removed. Some devices permanently remain within the bone and require very invasive surgeries if removal is necessary.

 

What to expect during and after hammertoe surgery

The goal of the surgeon is to restore normal alignment of the joint and eliminate pain by fusing the joint. A Digital Compression Screw is inserted into the tip of the toe and compresses the bones together, speeding the fusion process. The screw typically stays in for 6-8 weeks while the bones heal, after which it is removed.

Varying degrees of hammertoe deformities with severe contracture and/or displacement on the metatarsal heads may require your surgeon to perform additional procedures in conjunction with the hammertoe repair. These may include metatarsal osteotomies or tendon transfers to maintain toe purchase after fusion.

Most patients have a rapid recovery and have considerably less pain than they did before surgery. Weight-bearing is only allowed while wearing a stiff soled post-operative shoe until the screw is removed.

Flat Foot

2020-08-20T16:56:53+00:00

Understanding Flatfoot

Flatfoot is a condition where the arch on the inside border of the foot is flat rather than raised causing the foot and toe to turn out and the ankle to roll inward. Although there are several types of flatfoot, such as rigid and flexible flatfoot, they both have a common factor: partial or complete loss of the arch. The posterior tibial tendon serves as one of the major supporting structures of the arch. This tendon descends the leg, runs along the inside of the ankle, and down the side of the foot. When it overstretches or becomes inflamed, it often results in the flattening of the foot known as posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD). Health factors such as obesity, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis may increase the risk of developing flatfoot.

The term “flexible” means that the foot is flat when standing and returns to a normal arch in non- weight bearing positions.

The term “rigid” means that the arch stays flat or collapses even without weight pressure.

 

Symptoms

Common symptoms of flatfoot are:

• Ankle turned inward
• Weakness/fatigue felt in the foot or leg
• Pain felt in the shin
• Pain in the heel, arch, ankle, or along the outside of the foot

 

Treatments

Before considering surgery, there are always non-operative treatments such as:

• Shoe modifications
• Orthotic devices
• Medications
• Immobilization
• Physical therapy

Custom orthotics, arch supports prescribed by a foot and ankle specialist, are made individually for each patient and can be helpful in reliving symptoms. Each custom orthotic is specifically made from an impression of the patient’s foot. Long-term arch support with a reduction in symptoms is the main goal of custom orthotics.

When non-operative solutions are no longer able to control the pain and disability, surgery becomes a reasonable option. Surgical options include:

Arthroereisis – An implant is inserted within the sinus tarsi, which is the opening on the outside of the foot in between the ankle and heel bone. This restricts excessive joint rotation outward and creates an arch in the foot.

Arthrodesis (Fusion) – The cartilage surfaces of the joint are removed and a device such as a screw, plate, staple, etc. is utilized to prevent motion. The bones eventually fuse together which prevents pain; however, a loss of function occurs as the joint no longer functions. With this loss of function, your gait, or way of walking may change, which may affect other joints such as knees, hips, spine, etc.

Osteotomy – The bones are cut and reshaped to correct alignment.

 

Why the Subtalar Implant?

What the BioPro® Subtalar implant offers to the patient:

The BioPro® Horizon Subtalar implant acts as an internal orthotic, similar to wearing an orthotic within your shoe. The implant blocks excessive joint motion, maintaining the arch in your foot. The BioPro implant is designed with a smooth surface for your bones to rest against. This helps prevent any inflammation or bone erosion that is sometimes associated with this type of procedure.

The surgical procedure for the BioPro® Horizon Subtalar Implant usually lasts about 15 minutes. Before leaving, your surgeon is urged to also take an overhead X-ray to insure that the placement of the internal orthotic is correct.

Most patients have a quick recovery and are walking the same day of surgery or the following day. Patients may also require the use of a walking boot to help provide support to the operated area.

Other information:
Please note: the benefits of short surgery time and recovery are related to the arthroeresis procedure using the BiopPro® Horizon Subtalar Implant only. Often times, this is done in conjunction with other procedures. If you are having more than one surgery, you must follow your surgeon’s prescribed post operative protocol after surgery.

 

What to expect after flatfoot surgery

After surgery the surgical site should remain numb for approximately six to eight hours. It is important during your recovery to elevate your foot. The application of ice to the surgical site is another effective post-op tool that will aid in minimizing inflammation and pain. Within 10 days of your surgery you should return to your physician for a post-op visit. Between 4 to 6 weeks patients usually return to the majority of their daily activities. After 2 to 3 months, minimal soreness may still be present in some patients and may be reduced by applying ice.

Bunions

2020-08-20T16:57:38+00:00

Understanding Bunions

Bunions (hallux valgus) are a common foot problem involving the formation of a bump at the base of the big toe joint (first metatarsal joint). Bunions often lead to pain, swelling, and tenderness of the affected area. Sometimes, bunions can form on the outside base of the little toe. These are called a tailor’s bunion or bunionettes.

Bunions are found in people of all ages and genders. However, some people are more likely to get bunions than others, including:

  • Women
  • The elderly
  • People with a family history of bunions

Bunions occur in approximately 30% of women and 13% of men. They are found in 23% of adults ages 18 to 65 and over 35% of adults over the age of 65. Bunions are more likely to develop with advancing age. However, bunions have been reported in children as young as 5 or 6 years of age. Bunions in young children can get worse throughout childhood and adolescence and are highly linked to a family history of the condition. Bunions can be very painful and can get worse if left untreated.

 

Symptoms

The symptoms caused by bunions vary from person to person, and can include:

  • The appearance of a bump on the base of the big toe joint
  • Pain in or around the big toe joint, often described as a dull ache with some shooting pains
  • Reddening and/or inflammation of the bump from pressure and rubbing of the area
  • Pain when moving the big toe joint Formation of blisters and/or calluses in and around the first and second toes
  • Dull or sharp pain in the ball of the foot, especially in the center and spreading outward
  • Pain with walking or when wearing restrictive shoes

Over time, symptoms can worsen and include:

  • A shift of the big toe towards the second toe
  • Sometimes, this can change the position of the other toes and may even cause the toes to lie on top of one another
  • Arthritis of the big toe joint A stress fracture
  • Difficulty walking and finding comfortable shoes

The symptoms associated with bunions can vary from person to person. In fact, the worst bunions do not always cause the most severe symptoms. Furthermore, the wrong shoes and too much activity can causes symptoms to worsen. Once symptoms are felt, they generally get worse and the bunion must be treated.

 

Treatments

Non-Surgical Treatments for Bunions

Non-surgical treatment is a good way to reduce the pain and other symptoms associated with bunions, but these therapies will not cure or eliminate bunions. The success of non-surgical treatments often depends on the severity of the symptoms and how long the bunion has been present. Using non-surgical treatments early is important for preventing the development of more severe complications. If bunions are treated early, they can be managed and more serious interventions, such as surgery, may not be needed.

 

Wearing comfortable and supportive shoes is the first step in helping to relieve pain and other symptoms associated with bunions. Good choices for shoes may include:

  • A stretchable, breathable slip-on or tie type shoe
  • A shoe with good arch support and a wide toe box
  • A shoe that fits well and conforms to the shape of the foot
  • A shoe with a rigid heel counter

Custom orthotics, which are arch supports prescribed by a foot and ankle specialist, are made individually for each patient and can be helpful in relieving symptoms. Each custom orthotic is specifically made from an impression of the patient’s foot. Many modifications can be made depending on how bad the bunion is. Long-term arch support with a reduction in symptoms is the main goal of custom orthotics.

 

Surgical Treatments for Bunions 

Surgical correction for bunions may be recommended by a foot and ankle specialist. There are many effective surgical options available and the type of procedure selected is based on the needs of the patient and the current condition of the bunion. Before undergoing any procedure, it is important to have realistic goals and expectations about the surgery and the rehabilitation process, and to talk about the procedure with a foot and ankle specialist.

 

General goals for surgery:

  • Remove the bump on the big toe joint
  • Straighten the joint as much as possible
  • Provide greater range of motion

 

How does the BioPro Accu-Cut Guides Help?

Bunionectomies, the cutting of the first metatarsal, are traditionally done free hand. The Accu-Cut® Guide is available for a large variety of procedures and guide the blades to ensure the most precise cuts possible. This in turn ensures that the bone surfaces match up as closely as possible, helping speed bone healing time.

 

What to expect during and after bunion surgery?

Bunions can be categorized as simple, moderate or severe which will require different selective procedures, decided on by your surgeon. Surgery is typically not recommended only for improving the look of the foot. For a very minor bunion with bump pain, a foot and ankle specialist may recommend a simple shaving of the painful bump with or without soft tissue removal. However, this is not the way most bunions are corrected.

Bunion surgery commonly involves cutting the first metatarsal and shaving off the bony bump of the big toe joint. This is commonly referred to as a bunionectomy or an osteotomy. Once the metatarsal is cut, it is realigned into its appropriate position and is secured with screws or some other fixation device. The screws usually stay in the foot permanently, but may be removed once the bone fully heals.

Bunion surgery may be completed under local, spinal, or general anesthesia, depending on your surgeons preference.

 

Recovery and Rehabilitation for Bunion Surgery

What to expect after surgery:

  • There will be some pain after surgery
  • Wearing of a specialized postoperative shoe
  • There may be periodic swelling on or near the site of the bunion for 6-12 months
  • Physical therapy may be recommended
  • Long-term use of non-surgical devices, such as orthotics, and therapy is often recommended to prevent bunions from returning

Recovery time depends on the type of surgery that is performed and may vary from patient to patient. For example, recovery after a traditional bunionectomy will typically take longer than recovery after a simple shaving procedure. In most cases, a surgical shoe or walking boot is recommended after surgery. This allows the patient to return to normal activities sooner while still protecting the foot. If a cast is required, crutches, a walker, or a wheelchair may be used to assist in non-weight bearing of the recovering foot.

A physician is able to track bone healing through physical evaluations and by using x-rays. As a general rule, the patient can be more active and return to wearing normal shoes once the bone has fully healed. Even once the bone has healed, the patient may experience mild to moderate swelling and may need ongoing physical therapy and non-surgical treatment.

Fasciotome

2021-08-06T13:01:23+00:00

Fasciotome™

System Overview

The BioPro Fasciotome™ is intended to assist surgeons in percutaneous tenotomies and plantar fasciotomies. The Fasciotome features an extremely sharp, one-sided blade for effortless releases; provided in convenient single-use, sterile packs.

Clinical Benefits

  • Minimally invasive option for plantar fascia release1,2
  • Faster recovery1
  • Can be performed in-office

Ready to learn more?

Complete the form or contact us

Phone: +1-810-982-7777

Email: info@bioproimplants.com


Resources

TitleTypeDocument Linkdoc_type_hfilter
Fasciotome BrochureBrochure

View PDF

brochure
Fasciotome IFU (English)IFU

View PDF

ifu
  1. A Retrospective Comparison of Percutaneous Plantar Fasciotomy and Open Plantar Fasciotomy with Heel Spur Resection Fallat, Lawrence M. et al. The Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery , Volume 52 , Issue 3 , 288 - 290 2.
  2. Brian McCurdy. (2013, July). How Effective Is Percutaneous Plantar Fasciotomy? Retrieved from https://www.podiatrytoday.com/july-2013

Uni Knee System

2021-08-05T13:47:45+00:00

Uni Knee System

The Femoral component of the unicompartmental knee offers less soft tissue and bony destruction which means quicker rehabilitation with a high rate of long term success. The implant allows for minimum bone resection and offers multiple thickness polyethylene inserts to accommodate varying tibial plateau deficiencies. The anterior flange allows for more consistent tracking of the patella.

BIOPRO® UNI KNEE SYSTEM BENEFITS

•Anatomically Contoured Design
•Femoral component incorporates an anterior flange
•Minimal resection technique
•Porous coated femoral component available in five sizes,left and right
•Tibial tray available in four sizes
•Polyethylene tibial inset available in four sizes and three thickness

Resurfacing Hip

2021-08-05T13:44:27+00:00

Resurfacing Hip System

The BioPro® Total Articular Replacement Arthroplasty is a conservative, bone preserving prosthesis used as a hemi-arthorplasty. The implant requires the resection of one third of the femoral head. Preserving the maximum amount of bone possible.

It is an excellent option for avascular necrosis or arthritis of the hip where the acetabular cartilage is still in good condition. The implant provides patients with an excellent option over conventional hip replacement. In the event that total replacement is necessary in the future, minimum resection required for the BioPro® implant allows for sufficient bone stock for conversion to a primary total hip.

BIOPRO® RESURFACING HIP SYSTEM BENEFITS

  • Cobalt Chrome Hemiarthroplasty
  • Design has been successfully implanted since 1951
  • Curved stem for proper implant positioning
  • Partial resection technique removes 1/3 of the femoral head, removing the AVN affected bone

Total Knee System

2021-08-05T13:46:19+00:00

Total Knee System

As a resident, Dr. Charles Townley first sketched his ideas of a total knee replacement in the early 1940’s. The BioPro® TKO (Total Knee Original) knee replacement implant is the third generation of Dr. Townley’s original total knee replacement. It has been designed to provide anatomical articulating surfaces while preserving all of the stabilizing ligaments including the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) and PCL (posterior cruciate ligament). Recent studies have shown that knee replacements which preserve the ACL and PCL have a more “natural” feel than those that sacrifice the ligaments..

BIOPRO® KNEE BENEFITS

• Preservation of all ligaments
• Preservation of the normal polycentric joint motion
• Requires minimal bone resection
• Restores anatomic function

PSL Hip System

2021-08-05T13:42:50+00:00

PSL Hip System

Few hip designs in today's marketplace take advantage of the known forces present in the femur. Long term stability of a total hip prosthesis requires an implant design and fixation technique that simulates the normal transmission of weight bearing forces through the prosthesis to the supporting bone structure.

The PSL Hip System comes in 3 configurations to provide flexibility for the surgeon to accommodate the needs of the patient. The Living Hip or Ultra short hip stem helps address the issue of thigh pain in some patients. The elasticity of bone is greater than that of metal; therefore, if a stem extends into the anterior bow of the femur it can cause irritation and pain. The Living Hip is proximal to the area of the bend, reducing the chances of irritation to the femur.

The PSL Stem is offered in 3 stem lengths and up to 13 different stem diameters to meet patient requirements. All the PSL Stems continue the principals of Wolff’s Law while adding additional length desired for many applications.

PSL Stems photograph

Wolff's Law

Dr. Charles Townley based his PSL (Physiological Stress Loaded) design on Wolff’s law which states that “bone grows and remodels in response to the forces that are placed upon it”. The PSL design has clinically demonstrated its ability to resist bone loss due to proximal stress shielding by positioning the collar perpendicular to the resultant forces, Which maximizes the recreation of natural forces.

FEMORAL HEAD OPTIONS

The PSL Hip System comes with multiple femoral head options including:
•Ceramic Femoral Heads in 28mm and 32mm diameters
•Cobalt Chrome Femoral Heads in 22mm, 28mm, 32mm, and 36mm diameters
•Uni Polar Heads from 38mm to 55mm diameters
•Bipolar Head Options from 38mm to 60mm diameters

BioPro® Cox Comb Cup
Greater Range of Motion Reduced Dislocation

cox

 BioPro®Providence® Cup
Simple and Conservative

providence

BioPro®Rimmed Acetabular Cup
For Reconstructive Revision

rimmed_ace

Go to Top